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Yu-Gi-Oh! Episode 1



The season follows Yugi Mutou and his friends - Katsuya Jonouchi, Hiroto Honda, and Anzu Mazaki (renamed to Joey Wheeler, Tristan Taylor and Téa Gardener in the English adaptation) - to Duelist Kingdom, a tournament on the island of the same name, to free the soul of his grandfather, Sugoroku (renamed Solomon Moto in the English adaptation) from imprisonment by Pegasus J. Crawford (renamed Maximillion Pegasus in the English adaptation). The last ten episodes deal with the aftermath of Yugi's duel with Pegasus, including several filler episodes featuring original storylines not seen in the manga.




Yu-Gi-Oh! Episode 1



The first ten DVD volumes, as well as volumes 12 and 13, contain 3 episodes each. Volumes 11, 15, and 16 contain four episodes each and the fourteenth volume contains two episodes. The first volume was released on September 24, 2002. The complete first season set was released on August 10, 2004.


"The Ultimate Great Moth", known as "Ultimate Perfect Form, Great Moth" in the Japanese version, is the fifth episode of the Yu-Gi-Oh! second series anime. It first aired in Japan on May 16, 2000 and in the United States on October 20, 2001.


When this episode first aired in the United States on Kids WB!, it was merged with the previous episode, so the Duel took place in just one episode titled "The Ultimate Great Moth". The two separate episodes were dubbed, but were only seen in other countries and on DVD and VHS until 4Kids TV aired the episodes separately on December 2 and December 9, 2006.


The first Yu-Gi-Oh! anime adaptation was produced by Toei Animation and aired on TV Asahi between April 4, 1998 and October 10, 1998,[29] running for 27 episodes and one theatrical movie released on the 6th March, 1999. This adaptation was never released outside Japan.


Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters, known outside Japan as simply Yu-Gi-Oh!, is the second adaptation of the series. It was produced by Nihon Ad Systems and TV Tokyo, while animation for the show was done by Studio Gallop. Loosely adapting the manga from chapter sixty onwards, the series features several differences from the manga and the Toei-produced series and largely focuses around the game of Duel Monsters, tying in with the real life Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game. The series aired in Japan on TV Tokyo between April 18, 2000 and September 29, 2004, running for 224 episodes. A remastered version of the series, focusing on specific duels, began airing in Japan from February 7, 2015.[30]


An uncut version, featuring an all-new English dub track and the original Japanese audio, began release in October 2004, in association with Funimation Entertainment. Only three volumes, comprising the first nine episodes, were ever released. 4Kids would later release the uncut Japanese episodes on YouTube, in May 2009, but were forced to stop due to legal issues with ADK and Yugi's Japanese voice actor, Shunsuke Kazama.[33][34] Meanwhile, a separate English adaptation, produced by A.S.N., aired in South East Asia. The names were also Americanized, but the series setting and the original music remained intact.


A complete DVD boxset, including all English episodes and the Bonds Beyond Time movie, was released on July 15, 2014 via Amazon.[42]On July 11, 2015, 4K Media began releasing subtitled episodes to the Crunchyroll streaming site monthly.[43]


Yu-Gi-Oh! Capsule Monsters is a twelve-episode spin-off miniseries commissioned, produced and edited by 4Kids Entertainment, which aired in North America between September 9, 2006[44] and November 25, 2006. It is set before the end of Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters, apparently somewhere between episodes 198 and 199, and involves Yugi and his friends being pulled into a world filled with real Duel Monsters they can summon using capsules. It is similar to the Virtual RPG arc in many respects, but it does not seem to have anything to do with the early Capsule Monster Chess game featured in early volumes of the original manga. It is currently the only animated Yu-Gi-Oh! media not to be released in Japan, though it is referred to as Yu-Gi-Oh! ALEX. A DVD containing a condensed version of the Capsule Monsters episodes was released in May 2006.[45]


Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D's is the second main spin-off series also taking place in the 2000 universe, which aired for 154 episodes between April 2, 2008 and March 30, 2011. It was later licensed by 4Kids and aired in North America between September 13, 2008 and September 10, 2011. This series focuses around a motorcycling duelist named Yusei Fudo and introduces new concepts such as Turbo Duels, duels which take place upon motorbikes called Duel Runners, and Synchro Monsters, which were also added to the real life trading card game.


Yu-Gi-Oh! Zexal is the third main spin-off series, which aired in Japan between April 11, 2011 and March 23, 2014, which aired for 146 episodes.[62] The first series aired between April 11, 2011 and September 24, 2012. The story revolves around a boy named Yuma Tsukumo who, joined by an interstellar being known as Astral, must gather the 100 Numbers cards that make up his memory. The series adds yet another monster type, Xyz Monsters, which were added to the trading card game. 4Kids licensed the series and began airing the series in North America on The CW's Toonzai block from October 15, 2011.[63][64][65][66] After a legal battle with TV Tokyo and NAS caused 4Kids to file for bankruptcy, Konami received the rights to the series. The series aired on Saban's Vortexx block, with production done by 4K Media Inc.[67] A second series, titled Yu-Gi-Oh! Zexal II, aired in Japan between October 7, 2012 and March 23, 2014.[68]


Yu-Gi-Oh! Arc-V is the fourth main spin-off series, which aired for 148 episodes between April 6, 2014 and March 26, 2017, following Yu-Gi-Oh! Zexal. The series focuses on a new protagonist, Yūya Sakaki, who participates in the world of Action Duels, in which enhanced Solid Vision systems give substance to monsters and environments. The series introduces Pendulum Monsters and Pendulum Summoning, which were added to the trading card game.[70]


Yu-Gi-Oh! VRAINS is the fifth main spin-off series, which aired for 120 episodes between May 10, 2017 and September 25, 2019, following Yu-Gi-Oh! Arc-V. The series follows a new protagonist named Yusaku Fujiki who engages in duels on a virtual world under the alias "Playmaker", determined to take down an elusive group of hackers known as the "Knights of Hanoi". The series introduces Link Monsters, which are also added to the trading card game.[71][72]


The Yu-Gi-Oh! GX manga series was released in North America by Viz Media. It has been serialized in the manga magazine Shonen Jump, beginning in January 2007. Unlike the other manga serialized in the magazine, one chapter of the manga is printed per issue. Unlike the English-language editions of the original manga series, the English-language Yu-Gi-Oh! GX manga uses the English-language anime names created by 4Kids Entertainment. The GX episodes are rated 11+.


Yu-Gi-Oh is produced by Toei Animation, as a 27-episode anime, based on Yu-Gi-Oh! manga volumes 1-7, volumes which do not focus much on Magic & Wizards, nor is it connected in any way to Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters; another Yu-Gi-Oh! anime series made by Nihon Ad Systems (NAS), but is often referred to as the "first series" to distinguish it from the latter (or, erroneously, as Yu-Gi-Oh! Season/Series 0.) The show first aired on TV Asahi on April 4, 1998, and ended its run on October 10, 1998. This show was never officially released outside Japan.


During the dubbing process, the broadcast version of Yu-Gi-Oh! was edited and adapted to suit US cultural tastes. On October 19, 2004, 4Kids (in association with FUNimation) released uncut Yu-Gi-Oh! DVDs. These DVDs include the original, unedited Japanese animation and Japanese dialogue tracks with English subtitles, as well as all-new English dubs with translations closer to the original dialogues. Both language tracks use the original Japanese music. Each DVD contains three episodes; and there was a total of 3 DVDs released for a total of 9 episodes. The fourth DVD, called "Yu-Gi-Oh! Uncut Vol. #04: Red-Eyes Black Dragon DVD" (and containing episodes 10-12), was already dubbed and completed; ready to be sold and scheduled for release on May 4, 2005, but was never officially released. A 5th DVD containing episodes 13-15 was also mentioned around the time of the announcement of the fourth DVD (and before the indefinite delay/cancellation) but it is unknown if the DVD was merely planned for release or was actually completed and ready for release like the 4th DVD was. For a few months the release date(s) for the 4th DVD had been constantly extended or delayed, until it was confirmed that the product was not to be sold for an unknown amount of time, if ever. Shortly after that it had been confirmed 4Kids had decided to 'indefinitely delay' future releases of the series, saying that it was 'competing' with sales of their edited version DVDs and that they had decided to stop the uncut DVDs to stop the competition. (supposedly for a limited amount of time until all their edited DVDs were released and competition was over.) However, even now after all versions of their edited DVDs have been sold there still is no news on whether or not they plan to bring back the Uncut series. To this day the fourth DVD (and possibly fifth) still remain unreleased and the current status of the uncut DVDs and their future is unknown.


In May 2009, 4Kids Entertainment began to release full, uncut, English-subtitled Japanese-language Yu-Gi-Oh! episodes through their YouTube account. Many fans were very happy with this recent development, but those subtitled episodes were criticized for using the English dub character names in the subtitles as opposed to the Japanese names. 4Kids stated that they planned to release the entire series subtitled on their YouTube channel in the near future, but an announcement in August 2009 stated that all the Japanese episodes were to be removed due to legal issues with ADK (one of the primary producers of the anime) and Shunsuke Kazama, the original Japanese voice of Yugi. However, the English dub is still available, and 4Kids still plans to release subtitled versions of Yu-Gi-Oh! GX and Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D's, along with their English counterparts. However, due to the legal issues with Kazama, 4Kids has stated that they may have to drop all of the audio for Yugi's lines. 041b061a72


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